nissan

Nissan Titan Class Action: Defective Fuel Tank and Diesel Engines Issues

If you are looking to buy a new vehicle but are on a tight budget, a certified pre-owned (CPO) car can be a good idea. It could save you some money and will afford you the luxury of having the extension of the manufacturer’s warranty.

Some automakers introduced the CPO program in the early 1990s. Many vehicles were returning to dealerships in excellent condition, so manufacturers decided to resell the cars with detailed inspections, reconditioning, extended warranties, extra perks, and added peace of mind instead for perspective buyers.

What Is a Certified Pre-Owned Vehicle?

Unlike a used vehicle, a certified pre-owned car undergoes a mandatory inspection and should be refurbished to factory standards by technicians. Different dealerships have different conditions for their quality inspection but generally make sure that the car is in top-notch condition before putting it on sale. They also give you an extension of the manufacturer warranty coverage and piece of mind of the car’s new-like condition.

How Much Does a Certified Pre-owned Vehicle Cost?

CPO vehicles generally cost more than used vehicles as they undergo a thorough inspection and refurbishing process. They also come with a manufacturer-backed warranty that may include extra perks like free maintenance, free roadside assistance, and a complimentary loaner vehicle.

Right now, we are seeing a hike in used car pricing compared to last year and it’s hard to get an affordable used car of any kind. So do good research before investing in a vehicle.

Is There Value in A Certified Pre-owned Vehicle? 

The present car market is growing like the housing market. We are already seeing 10% higher pricing than last year. Looking at the raw figures, people are investing more in used cars than new ones. 

The used car market is huge and CPO cars are a small part of it. For now, the used-vehicle market has a 48-day supply and average prices are nearly $20,000 less than a new car. Certified pre-owned cars have mileage limits and look attractive with good enough shape and extended warranty. These cars are usually late models off-lease cars with less than 40,000 miles. Let’s see some CPO practices these days:

Older, High-Mileage Vehicles

We are seeing older and high mileage cars being labeled as certified pre-owned cars these days. In the coming months, Nissan will certify non-Nissan vehicles with a six-year/60000-mile warranty than the seven-year/100,000-mile warranty that Nissan vehicles get. General Motors is launching Car Bravo, a new consumer CPO service to certify any brand’s vehicle. 

Ford is selling all brand vehicles under its Blue Advantage program for up to 120,000 miles and offers a 14-day/1000-mile return policy. Honda is certifying 10-year-old cars with no mileage limits under its Honda True Used program. More manufacturers will soon start selling old, high mileage vehicles to cash in on the present demand.

Fewer Quality Checks, Potentially Higher Risk

Certified Pre-owned vehicles are supposed to undergo a thorough quality inspection where the dealership will check off nearly 200 items on the paper. The automaker sets the audit rules and practices, but CPO vehicles don’t get inspected by factory employees. 

Depending on dealership diligence, a CPO vehicle still could have underlying issues that were present at the time of trade in so it still may be worth your while to bring to a mechanic to diagnosis prior to purchase. Manufacturers are introducing high-mileage CPO programs in multiple tiers of CPO cars with separate names—and they each have wildly varying certification requirements. Not all CPO’s are created equal.

For example, Honda now has three CPO labels (Honda True Used, Honda True Certified, Honda True Certified+) all with different warranty coverages and age limitations. Ford has a 139-point inspection on Blue Certified vehicles vs the 172 points on Gold Certified vehicles.

So not all are right for every buyer, and you may be better off with a brand new car than a used car. It’s the most discouraging buyer’s market in decades so if you’re going for a certified pre-owned car, make sure to check everything thoroughly.

Have A Lemon Vehicle? Talk With Us Now

If you are an automobile owner and have manufacturing issues, you can contact us regarding your involvement in this or any potential class-action lawsuit. Serious vehicle problems require serious legal representation, especially when you are bringing a claim against a major automaker. 

At the Lemon Firm, our experienced Attorneys have been able to successfully recover compensation for our clients who were sold a vehicle with manufacturer defects, and we can do the same for you. Call (833) Lemon-Firm to speak with a Lemon law expert today.

nissan vehicles

Nissan Defective CVT Transmission Class Action Lawsuit Reached $277.7M Settlement

A Nissan defective CVT transmission lawsuit settlement has been reached between the automaker and vehicle owners, and the automaker will pay $277.7 million to resolve the defective transmissions claims.

The Nissan class action settlement includes the following vehicle models:

  •     2014 to 2018 Nissan Rogue
  •     2015 to 2018 Nissan Pathfinder
  •     2015 to 2018 Infiniti QX60

The Nissan CVT class action lawsuit was consolidated from five lawsuits: Stringer v. Nissan, Newton v. Nissan, Landa v. Nissan, Lane v. Nissan, and Eliason v. Nissan.

According to the Nissan class action lawsuit, vehicles were equipped with defective transmissions and CVTs used in Nissan Rogues and other vehicles allegedly caused poor transmission performance, shuddering and shaking, and even complete transmission failure.

The plaintiffs who sued claim Nissan knew about the CVT problem for years due to numerous complaints to the company and to the National Highway Transportation Safety Authority (NHTSA). Instead of taking action, Nissan allegedly failed to warn customers or fix the problem.

Nissan owners claim transmission repairs can cost thousands of dollars, and owners and lessees were allegedly forced to pay “exorbitant” costs to repair the CVTs even when the vehicles are covered by warranties.

As part of the settlement agreement, Nissan denies all claims related to the transmissions and denies all allegations of wrongdoing, but has agreed to pay $277.7 million to resolve the claims.

Nissan CVT Lawsuit Settlement

Although Nissan and the plaintiffs agreed to settle the class action lawsuit, a federal judge must still sign off on the terms. However, the proposed CVT lawsuit settlement includes the following.

Nissan CVT Warranty Extension

All settlement Class Members are eligible for a new vehicle limited warranty extension for the transmission assembly (including the valve body and torque converter) and transmission control unit under the Nissan transmission class action settlement deal.

This benefit extends the warranty on Class vehicles by 24 months or 24,000 miles — whichever comes first. For Nissan vehicles, the new vehicle limited warranty covers 84 months or 84,000 miles and for Infinity vehicles, the new vehicle limited warranty covers 96 months or 96,000 miles.

Nissan CVT Reimbursement

Nissan will provide cash reimbursement for owners or lessees who have had to pay for transmission assembly or control unit repairs out of pocket after their warranty expires.  If the replacement or repair was performed by a Nissan dealer, the full amount paid will be reimbursed. If the repair or replacement was performed by a non-Nissan dealer, Nissan will reimburse up to $5,000.

However, in both cases, the CVT replacement or repair must have occurred on or within the mileage and time limits of the Nissan warranty extension.

Nissan Vouchers

The Nissan CVT lawsuit settlement also may provide a $1,000 voucher toward the purchase or lease of a new vehicle but the voucher must be used within nine months of the effective date of the CVT lawsuit settlement.

According to the settlement, a customer must choose to receive the voucher or reimbursement, but not both, and must provide any requested documentation to prove they paid for Nissan CVT repairs or replacements.

How Much More Time?

The deadline for exclusion and objection is Feb. 22, 2022. Although the settlement deal was awarded preliminary approval on Oct. 13, 2021, the final approval hearing for the settlement is scheduled for March 21, 2022.

Final Thoughts

If you are an automobile owner and have manufacturing issues, you can contact us regarding your involvement in this potential class-action lawsuit. Serious vehicle problems require serious legal representation, especially when you are bringing a claim against a major automaker. At the Lemon Firm, our experienced California Consumer Attorneys have been able to successfully recover compensation for our clients who were sold a vehicle that did not perform as intended and we can do the same for you. Our experienced attorneys can be reached by calling (833) Lemon-Firm.

nissan altimas

Nissan Altima Hood Latch Class Action

By Andrea Plata

A class action lawsuit has been brought against Nissan for faulty hood latches on their vehicles. Consumers are claiming that the company’s recall has not fixed the problem.

What Is an Automobile Class Action Lawsuit?

A class action lawsuit is a lawsuit brought by a group of plaintiffs who have suffered similar damages or injuries. Automobile class action lawsuits are typically brought when a group of plaintiffs is claiming that a specific auto part has either design or manufacturing defects. The term defect is used to describe a condition of a consumer product that does not meet a consumer’s reasonable expectation.

Nissan Hood Latch Recalls

There have been four recalls for hood latch defects on Nissan vehicles. The allegations in the lawsuit explain that the Nissan hood design has an exterior and interior latch system but due to certain defects the vehicle’s hood will come unlatched while driving. The allegations state that this issue is present no matter how fast the driver is going and that the hood will come unlatched at any speed. Nissan Ultima owners began complaining about these issues in 2013 and Nissan was investigating the alleged defect as early as 2014.

Reports allege that Nissan placed the blame on the latch defect on the drivers, service technicians, and various suppliers and issued recalls in the following years,

Nissan Altima 2014 Hood Latch Recall

The company issued a recall in 2014 for the model year 2013 Nissan Altima stating that debris between the hood and inner panel could cause the interior latch to remain open. The recall required dealerships to inspect, clean, and lubricate the interior latch. If an inspection found that the interior latch did not move freely and was defective, the dealerships were instructed to bend the latch with a crowbar to remedy the issue.

Nissan Altima 2015 Hood Latch Recall

In 2015, the company issued yet another recall for model year 2013-2015 cars, but this time claiming that the anti-corrosion hood latch protection applied by a supplier was faulty and was the reason for the defective hood latch. Nissan explained that flaking paint was to blame as it left the bare metal exposed and increased the risk of corrosion.

The fix for the 2015 recall involved dealers applying a rust treatment if a car was found to have a faulty hood latch.

Nissan Altima 2016 Hood Latch Recall

The next year in 2016, a subsequent recall was issued for the model year 2013-2015 cars. Again, the company cited a delinquent supplier for the car’s hood latch issue. Dealers were told to replace the hood latch assembly on cars with faulty hood latches.

Nissan Altima 2020 Hood Latch Recall

Last year Nissan issued their fourth recall for the model year 2013-2018 Altima cars. Nissan reported that they were aware of at least 16 minor crashes and injuries that were caused by faulty hood latches. When announcing the 2020 recall, Nissan stated that their remedy plan for the issue was “under development”.

Class Action Claims

The class action suit brought against Nissan claims that the company has been aware of the defect since 2013 and although they cite various reasons for the faulty hood latch, they have been unable to offer consumers an adequate remedy. The consumer’s complaint alleges that the company could have employed a new hood latch design in their vehicles over the past eight years but has neglected to change the design and has done so at the expense of its customer’s safety.

Consumers are alleging that Nissan’s design of their hood latch system is not up to industry standards as it is not strong enough to perform under real-world conditions, claiming that the hood latch fails at even minor speeds. The lawsuit also claims that the hood latches inside the vehicle are located too close to the fuel door latches and this causes drivers to accidentally unlatch the hoods instead of the fuel doors, creating a dangerous and unsafe condition for drivers.

The Nissan Altima hood latch class action lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, San Francisco Division: Miller, et al., v. Nissan North America, Inc.

nissan vehicles

Nissan Class Action Lawsuit Filed Over Warranties

By: Nicole Halavi

In October 2020, a class-action lawsuit brought against Nissan alleged the automaker failed to properly identify car parts according to California’s emission control system warranty requirements. Specifically, Nissan failed to classify parts as emissions warranty parts and high-cost emissions warranty parts. In California, those parts are covered under the emissions warranty for 7 years and 70,000 miles.

The class of plaintiffs includes all drivers in California who, within the last 4 years, have been owners or lessees of the Nissan MY 2011-MY 2017 Juke models and who have paid for repairs and parts for the fuel pump that should have been covered under the automaker’s high-priced warranty parts emissions warranty.

As is often the case, the plaintiffs claimed Nissan refused to pay out for warranty repairs, so instead the automaker limited the parts to be covered under the emissions warranty. Nissan allegedly also limited the high-cost emissions warranty parts that should be covered for 7 years and 70,000 miles, including the Juke fuel pumps.

What are Nissan’s “warranted parts” and “high-priced warranted parts”?

The California Code of Regulations (CCR) defines how the automaker should identify which car parts should be covered as emission parts, and which should be covered as high-priced emission parts.

A “warranted part” is defined as, “any part installed on a motor vehicle or motor vehicle engine by the vehicle or engine manufacturer, or installed in a warranty repair, which affects any regulated emission from a motor vehicle or engine which is subject to California emission standards.” CCR §2035

Therefore, any car part that affects the car’s emissions or causes the on-board diagnostic malfunction indicator light to illuminate should be considered a “warranted part.” This part should have a 3-year, 50,000-mile warranty.

On the other hand, a “high-priced warranted part” should have a 7-year, 70,000-mile warranty because of the labor cost of diagnosing and replacing the defective part.

Unfortunately, Nissan has allegedly omitted from its warranty booklets all the parts that should be identified as emissions related “warranted parts” and “high-priced warranted parts.” As a result, affected customers are told by dealerships that fuel pumps are not covered under the emissions warranties when they in face should be. The cost of repairing or replacing these parts then fall on the customers.

What Can I Do if My Nissan is Experiencing Emissions Problems?

If you are driving a Nissan model that is exhibiting any of the above-mentioned issues, California’s lemon laws are here to protect you and prevent any further complications. The attorneys at CCA are very knowledgeable about the various emissions warranties discussed above and will work with you to fight back against the automaker.

Please do not hesitate to call CCA today for a free consultation: (833) LEMON-FIRM. We’ll get you the compensation you deserve – and at no cost to you!